Learning in the PYP – 2

Grade 1 Unit 1 : How We Organize Ourselves (Central Ideas: People in organizations have different, interconnected roles) Grade 1 Japanese Native Class students took an exploration walk around school to learn the different roles people play, by conducting video interviews with some of the staff members. Students investigated mainly Japanese staff, because the interviewers were conducted in Japanese. For the interviews, students used the formal style of speech in Japanese. Although students knew most of the staff they interviewed, they were a bit nervous. Students used their prepared notes and with the help of classmates, all students successfully accomplished their mission! After the interviews, students discussed their findings while watching videos of the interviews. Through this activity, students have learned: 1) how to introduce themselves and ask questions politely, 2) new school-related vocabulary, 3) how each staff member’s job was connected to their school life, and, 4) the importance of every staff member’s role in the school community. It was also a fun experience for the students to explore the USB classrooms, which they had never seen before. A big thank you from the Grade 1 students to all Japanese office staff, and also to Megumi-san, Teruko-san, and Daizo-san, for your patience during the interviews. Arigatoo gozaimashita! Yuko Kipnis Japanese...

read more

Learning in the MYP

MAKING IT WORK This year has seen the introduction of additional features to the Design program at TIS. The students now follow a program that encompasses coding and innovation activities. As the year has progressed to date the Grade 6 students have had an enthusiastic introduction to using Scratch, a computer coding program. This new language has been so popular that a group of Grade six students have started their own Scratch competition for Grade 5 and middle school students. Coding has made its way into the other middle school classes. All classes will get an introduction to Scratch, but all classes are having coding experience with the ‘Hour of Code’. This is leading to experiences in actually writing a program in their own code for the Mindstorm Robots in Grade 7 and looking at how coding can be incorporated into their Innovation projects for the Grade 8’s. Soon, we will begin developing their own Maker projects with electronics that they can code with their Arduino boards. Design moves on as the Grade Six students start their design projects soon. They will be designing and building bridges. These bridges will have a carefully engineered look as they will all reflect a need to take into account a given environmental condition. This will be a small group project and involve all students getting their ‘machine license’ so they can use the machines in the Design Lab to make their bridges. Please note: A copy of the machine license e-book will be sent home to all parents by e-mail with-in the next week. Safety is a paramount concern for all TIS students, but so is competency in using the equipment we have. Students’ ability to make things, real working things, is a life skill we need to encourage and embed. The laser cutter is up and running and students will be getting to design pieces to be made in it, in their project phase. We are also looking for parent volunteers. Our Grade 8 students are nearly ready to make their ‘pitches’ for their innovation projects. We are looking for people from the investment banking, entrepreneurial, computer programmers and developers to come and listen to their pitches and offer advice as to their viability. These projects will be made, at least to the prototype stage. But marketing and target audiences are vital considerations in any innovation project and any outside help would be greatly appreciated. It’s an exciting year in Design as all its possibilities are discovered and developed. Mike Izzard Art & Design...

read more

Steps for Syria

a walk-a-thon to raise money for Syrian child refugees Dear Students, Teachers, Parents and Carers, My name is Hank Harris and I am a Grade 7 student at Tokyo International School. Recently there has been lots on the news about Syrian refugees seeking asylum in safe European countries. I was thinking a lot about this and what I could do as a student to help, so, I came up with Steps for Syria – a project to support Syrian Refugees. The men, women, young and old people of Syria are taking an approximately 3,000 kilometre journey between Syria and Germany, and/or other nations in Europe. This made me think about how bad their lives must be if they feel it is necessary to leave their homes under such terrible conditions. I was amazed at how long their journey was and how much walking the people of Syria were doing. I came up with the idea of a walk-a-thon, where children could be sponsored to raise money for Children of Syria, Save the Children’s program for the Syrian refugee crisis (learn about it at www.savethechildren.org.). We will be walking about 3 kilometres from Tokyo Midtown to Arisugawa Park, a distance of approximately 1/1000th of the distance that Syrian children are travelling to find safety. It would be wonderful if you could support your child(ren) by accompanying them on the walk-a-thon. Or letting them participate if they are old enough to do so on their own. If you can’t make it, then please give generously to someone who is doing the walk, or maybe a few people…   Here is everything you need to know: When: 10:30-12:00pm (approx.), Saturday November 7th, 2015 Where: Tokyo Midtown Park, Roppongi Meet at the playground slides at Hinokicho Park – look for the peace balloon – the walkers will depart at 10:40am SHARP This is the proposed route – it may change if necessary To receive a sponsorship form to raise money and take part in this event please email. Please return your completed form with all the sponsorship money to the Steps for Syria box at TIS Reception by Friday the 13th of November. We will then collect all the money for a consolidated donation to Save the Children and hopefully it will help Syrian refugee kids in some way on their journey to peace and safety. Please e-mail me if you have any questions. I hope to see you all at the walk-a-thon, and thanks for helping Steps for Syria. Yours sincerely, Hank (Grade 7...

read more

PE News

St.Mary’s Term One Swim Meet Tigers in...

read more

Music News

Alma Deutscher Ten year old violinist, pianist, composer, and child prodigy, Alma Deutscher, will be performing next week (Thursday, October 15) with the Tokyo Sinfonia at Oji Hall in Ginza. The Tokyo Sinfonia will be featuring Alma Deutscher as the composer of the entire evening of music. During the first half, she will also appear as the violin soloist for the violin concerto, and in the second half as the piano soloist for the piano concerto. They will also perform the overture and scenes from the opera Cinderella, which she completed and had premiered earlier this year. All who have worked with Alma say that the ten year old is “a refreshingly charming and approachable young girl.” To see and hear a performer of this caliber at such a young age is a great opportunity for your students. This is a concert you won’t want to miss! Attached is the flyer for the performance. Alma Deutscher Concert...

read more

Nurse News

What You Need to Know in case of Emergency Could you remember important information about your child’s health in an emergency? Because that can be difficult, doctors suggest that parents keep a record of their kids’ important health facts handy. This can help a medical team make a better, quicker diagnosis when time really counts. Making a complete written or computer-based medical history for your kids is a good idea. Be sure their medical records have this information:   Allergies This is especially important if a child is allergic to any medications – penicillin, for example – or other antibiotics. Allergies to food, dye, or contrast material (dye or other substances used in tests like CAT scans) can come into play, too, so make note of anything your child has had a reaction to. Kids who’ve previously been hospitalized may have developed latex allergies. This information can sometimes help emergency personnel find a cause for problems such as breathing difficulties and hives.   Medications Your handy medical records should list any medicines, including dosages that your kids currently take. Some medicines react badly when taken together, so that paramedics and doctors need this information before they give a child anything. You’ll need to know when a child took the medication last and how much was taken.   Pre-Existing Illnesses It is also very important for emergency personnel to be told of any health problems or illnesses a child has had. For example, does your child have diabetes, a bleeding disorder, or asthma? These pre-existing conditions can have a huge effect on which tests and treatments are used in an emergency. Kids who have a chronic health problem or a known allergy should wear an identifying tag on a necklace or bracelet. This kind of rapid notification can help doctors who are providing emergency care, especially if a child suddenly becomes ill at school or friend’s house. Don’t forget to include the dates and surgeries a child has had – this can be important to the course of treatment in an emergency.   Immunizations Keeping a clear and up-to-date record of your kids’ immunization history can help doctors do a better job of diagnosing a problem in an emergency. If the doctor suspects that a child has an infection, for example, it may save much time to know that the child has had a particular immunization.   Weight There may not be time to weigh a child in an emergency. Having a recent weight handy can help doctors calculate dosages of any medicine that may be needed.   Family History A family medical history is helpful information to have on hand. Doctors usually ask if anyone else in the family has any medical problems because this can be an important piece of information when diagnosing and dealing with a current illness. You might not be able to recall all this information in an emergency, so add it to your kids’ medical records. It doesn’t take long to compile a written or computer-based medical history for your kids. And doing so could mean saving critical minutes – when they count most!   To Call Ambulance in Japan Please remember, to call ambulance in Japan is 119.   Other Resources Emergency Medical Information Center 03-5285-8181 (Daily 9:00-20:00) Languages: English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish Information about medical institutions as well as about the medical and health insurance system in Japan are provided by staff that speaks foreign languages. Emergency Medical Translation Services 03-5285-8185 (Weekdays 17:00-20:00, Weekends and Holidays 9:00-20:00) Languages: English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish Interpretation services through phone is available for foreigners visiting a hospital if their treatment is not...

read more