Learning in the PYP

Looking for Learning – What’s been happening in the PYP at TIS this week The “big” event this week is our Grade 5 exhibition, the culminating event in the Primary Years Program. On Thursday throughout the morning, the Grade 5 students shared their exhibition process with all the grade levels at TIS as well as students from YIS and Tsukuba International School. In the evening they presented their prepared information speeches as well as their displays to their parents, mentors and other teachers. We were so proud of the Grade 5 students as they showed us as experts how knowledgeable they are about their issue, how they had grown as competent communicators and how they had also become more effective inquirers during the exhibition process. We also noticed how enthusiastic committed and collaborative the groups were during the day. A huge thanks goes out to the grade five team of Gabby, Kenny and Matt for their commitment and effort in ensuring a successful exhibition this year. We will be putting together the different videos and photos we have taken on the night and will compile these and make this available to you. Greg Parker PYP...

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Learning in the MYP #1

Grade 8 Design Innovation Projects Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the Design program in the MYP. In this subject, students use the design cycle, which underpins the design process, to inquire and analyse, create and develop solutions, and to evaluate. Earlier in the year, I wrote about the Grade 8 students embarking on a year journey into design innovation. In groups, the students had to develop a design based on a need in the community. These projects are now in the final stages, and on Tuesday the students practiced pitching their design ideas and solutions to their peers, Lorraine, Chris and I. The students were assessed against the following criteria: – Their understanding of the nature of the product – Clarity of the pricing and marketing strategies – General presentation and belief in their project Some very interesting and creative ideas and solutions were developed in the Design unit such as “Beary”, a fun and useful project that takes phone chargers to the next level; “Glooob”, an app that can notify student when homework has been posted on Manabi Mon; “DT Editor”, a pdf editor that will enable the user to edit text; “Melty”, a cup that melts chocolate or caramel and that is reusable; “Teen Web”, a website by teenagers for teenagers living in Minato-ku; “Pixel Maze”, a fun game for phones and tablets. The last and final step will be for the students to pitch their creative designs to possible investors. The Design team consisting of Mike Izzard and Edith Santacana are in the process of approaching various people who might be interested in learning about, and investing, in these great products designed and developed by the Grade 8 class. Kristine Adelsboell Middle School & MYP...

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Learning in the MYP #2

Inside the MYP Math Classroom In Grade 6, our second unit has focused on relationships and quantity through learning about ratios, rates (including percent), and proportions. Students have experienced these topics in a number of ways. We’ve looked into making perfect scrambled eggs and chocolate milk with just the right amount of ingredients, how long it takes for light to reach the moon, and finally how we can make wise choices in life with our money and how taxes can affect the lives of people around the world. To the right we have Luke (6B) searching his face for the golden ratio during one exploration. In Grade 7, our unit has focused on gaining a deeper understanding of ratios, rates (including percent), and proportions through problem solving. Through many different explorations, students developed an understanding of how to use what they know about these topics to develop algebraic rules, which generalize them. Students applied their knowledge to many different areas, including the concept of simple interest. Students derived the formula for calculating such interest, and learned about different scenarios where simple interest can and cannot be used. In the picture to the left, Oscar (7B) is doing as many high knees as he can, while Zac (7B) times him, and Jina (7B) counts how many Oscar has done. After recording their data in a table, students also analyzed it graphically and algebraically to determine who was the fastest in the class. In Grade 8, we have continued our lengthy second unit, in which we have focused on learning more about working with algebraic expressions and equations. Most recently, we have analyzed various scenarios which lead to linear equations as well as systems of linear equations (both in only 2 variables). Students have learned the meaning of a solution to an equation and to a system, and they investigated to discover the relationship between a solution to a system and the point of intersection of their graphs. Students learned the 3 most common methods for finding such solutions to a system, and have analyzed enough systems to be able to determine when to choose one method over another. Finally, students have connected what we have learned about both proportional relationships, and these equations to exchange rates in order to apply their knowledge to real life financial scenarios. In the picture to the right we see Danish timing Danish competing against his classmates in a “Guess Who” like game, where students needed to ask yes or no questions using descriptive math vocabulary to determine the graph that matched their partner’s. Seth Reisner Grade 6 / MYP Math...

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Counselor’s News

NOTES FROM THE COUNSELLOR – Edward Woods, T.I.S. Counselor K1 – G8 On Tuesday we had a very interesting seminar and discussion about transitioning. Here is a synopsis and a link to the presentation. The Only Thing that does not change: is Change! One of the characteristics of children that attend international schools, is that their families move often. That means that they as well as their families must deal with issues that surround the subject of Change! There are any number of factors that effect the success of making a change. For some it is easier than for others. That can happen within a family. Some family members seem to thrive on movement and change whereas others may find it very stressful and uncomfortable. There are a number of “tips” that may ease the cultural adjustment. • Travel in a spirit of humility with a genuine desire to meet and talk with local people. • Maintain a sense of humor. • Cultivate the habit of listening and observing, rather than merely seeing or hearing. • Know that culture shock is a part of the process of adjusting. • Go out; see people; do things. • Be aware of the feelings of local people to prevent what might be offensive behavior. • Stay healthy (get plenty of rest, eat well and exercise). There are a number of “tips” that may ease the shock of moving for your children as well. • Be positive. Children can pick up the parent attitudes. • Try to keep a schedule if at all possible. Stress often comes with change. Structure and predictability offers security and comfort. • Ask open-ended questions and then be available to listen to your child. • Encourage on-going contact with old friends and family members that they have left. • Recognize and accept that everyone experiences adjustment issues in some form and to some degree. • Be patient. Roots grow slowly.   WORKSHOP OFFERING: Managing Transitions For those of you that were unable to attend the workshop on Tuesday, May 10th, I have included the slide presentation here so that you might be able to take advantage of some of the ideas that were presented. I, of course, am always available to you if you would like to make an appointment to see me and discuss your upcoming move and the challenges that you think you will be facing. Ed Woods...

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Language Support News

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month. Each year in May, our community celebrates the progress of our students and raises awareness about communication development. This year’s theme for Better Hearing and Speech Month is “Communication Takes Care.” Building Communication Skills: Suggestions for Families • Unplug – Spend quality time together without phones, tablets, TV, or other electronic devices. • Engage – Include meaningful conversation in family time. Listen, comment, ask questions, and share with your child. Kids learn through verbal communication and social interaction with others. • Read – Reading with your child helps build the skills he/she needs to experience success in school. • Play – Family relationships and social skills develop through play. • Move – Physical activity is crucial to children’s development. Take a bike ride, play ball, go for a family walk, or visit a Tokyo park. • Ask – If you think your child may have a speech-language delay, ask for a screening. If you have questions or concerns about your child’s communication skills, please contact Lisa Muntz, Head of Student Support, or Julie Dotson, Speech Pathologist. Additional information is available at the TIS Learning Support Office. *Adapted from Communication Takes Care: Better Hearing and Speech Month, R. Kjesbo, M.S., CCC-SLP Lisa Muntz / Student Support Julie Dotson / Speech...

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Sports News

Interschool Table Tennis Tournament On Thursday April 28th, TIS students played a table tennis tournament. The British School, Nishimachi, and Montessori School came to play. There were different tournaments for boys and girl and 3rd/4th, 5th/6th and 7th/8th graders. TIS had at least one player in the championship game for each of the levels we played in. The 3rd and 4th grade final was between Aaron Igari and Theo Andrews. Theo won! Max Otter from 7th grade took second place against a boy who was incredible. It was fun to play against other schools and compete for TIS. By: TJ Robbins 3A and Coach...

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